Connectra Fusion - a Georg Fischer Piping Systems member company
Georg Fischer Connectra, LLC

1.800.654.3872
Georg Fischer Piping System
Connectra is the company focused on polyethylene pipe fusion and only fusion. Equipment and service that is cost-effective, robust and no-nonsense. Basic. Smart. Simple. Connectra is a member company of Georg Fischer Piping Systems.

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is butt fusion?
2. Are butt-fused joints as strong as mechanically coupled joints?
3. Does more expensive equipment produce better fusion-joints?
4. How long does it take for a Connectra® machine to make a fusion joint?
5. What do Connectra’s model numbers mean?
6. Do you need extensive training to operate Connectra® fusion machines?
7. Can Connectra® equipment be operated by one person?
8. Will I need a generator for my Connectra® machine?
9. What does “DR” designate?
10. What is the “interfacial pressure?”
11. How can I easily determine proper fusion pressure?
12. Are there published procedures for fusing polyethylene pipe?
13. How can I determine the quality of a fusion joint?
14. What is “facing”?
15. How much material should be removed in facing?
16. What pipe sizes will Connectra® machines fuse?
17. What is an “IPS” pipe size?
18 What is a “DIPS” pipe size?
19. What is a “DN” pipe size?
20. What is a “CTS” pipe size?
21. What accessories are available with Connectra’s machines?

FAQs

1. What is butt fusion?

Simply put, butt fusion joints are made by joining two molten pipe ends together under pressure. There are six steps to fusing pipe:

  • Secure and clean the pipe
  • Face the pipe ends
  • Align the pipe profile
  • Melt the pipe ends
  • Join the two pipes together
  • Hold under pressure while the pipe cools

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2. Are butt-fused joints as strong as mechanically coupled joints?

Properly made, joints made by butt fusion are stronger and more reliable than mechanically coupled pipe. The joints don’t leak and are as strong as, or stronger than, the native.

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3. Does more expensive equipment produce better fusion-joints?

Our equipment is precision made, but rugged and simple to operate. Connectra® equipment efficiently produces high quality joints time after time. Higher priced equipment with all the bells and whistles will not produce better joints.

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4. How long does it take for a Connectra® machine to make a fusion joint?

The time it takes to make a joint depends on the pipe size, wall thickness, and specific conditions of the jobsite and construction procedures. Connectra® machines are as efficient and productive as more expensive and complicated machines. Additionally, our customers report that they have less down time for maintenance when compared with more complicated equipment.

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5. What do Connectra’s® model numbers mean?

Model numbers on our butt fusion equipment indicate the range of pipe sizes that the particular equipment will fuse. A 620 machine, for example, will fuse pipe between 6” IPS and 20” IPS in diameter; a 1442 will fuse pipe between 14” IPS and 42” IPS in diameter.

We also use several machine-type designations:

  • M – manual
  • HP – a hand pump supplies the force necessary for fusion pressure
  • EP – an electric pump supplies the force necessary for fusion pressure
  • SC – self contained – all equipment, including the generator required to supply electricity to the heater plate and electric pump, is on-board
  • CQ – close quarters – compact design for use on pipe racks or tight trenches

Therefore, our 28EP has an electric pump and will fuse pipe between 2” IPS and 8” DIPS in diameter.

More information is available in the various products sections of our website.

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6. Do you need extensive training to operate Connectra® fusion machines?

Connectra’s machines are designed to be simple to operate. Training on many Connectra® machines is much faster and easier than on more complicated machines. Your distributor can provide orientation and training. Connectra® also offers certified training in the use of our equipment.

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7. Can Connectra® equipment be operated by one person?

Connectra® fusion machines are designed to be easily operated by one person. Additional equipment or labor may be needed to handle pipe or transport equipment.

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8. Will I need a generator for my Connectra® machine?

If the Connectra® equipment is designated SC (self contained) the generator comes with the equipment. Please review the Product section to determine the capabilities of each piece of equipment. Also, review the technical bulletin section to determine generator size requirements.

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9. What does “DR” designate?

"DR" stand for "dimensional ratio." The dimensional ratio is the nominal outside diameter of the pipe divided by the wall thickness of the pipe. It is used to determine the pressure rating of the pipe. Since the DR is an indicator of wall thickness, it can also be used to determine the proper interfacial force required to properly fuse a pipe. "SDR" stands for "standard dimensional ratio," and refers to standardized dimensional ratios as referenced in certain ASTM standards.

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10. What is the “interfacial pressure?”

Interfacial pressure is the force, in lbs. per square inch, required to fuse a polyethylene pipe. This number is used in a calculation with the surface area of the pipe end to determine the total fusion force required to fuse a given pipe. The gauge pressure that is used on a fusion machine is determined by a calculation utilizing total force and the cylinder area of the fusion machine.

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11. How can I easily determine proper fusion pressure?

In simple terms, fusion pressure is determined by the size of pipe, the DR designate, and selected interfacial pressure. PPI’s generic fusion guidelines (TR33) give general recommendations on interfacial pressure, or they may be specified by the owner of the pipeline. Once the pipe size and DR are known, and interfacial pressure selected, one can use the calculator on this website to determine gauge pressure for any given machine.

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12. Are there published procedures for fusing polyethylene pipe?

Yes. The Plastics Pipe Institute has published generic guidelines for fusion of plastic pipe. You can download its TR33 from our technical library or from http://www.plasticpipe.org/pdf/pubs/reports/TR-33-2003.pdf.

The entire PPI Handbook of Polyethylene Pipe, covering all aspects of design and installation of polyethylene pipe can be downloaded from http://www.plasticpipe.org/applications/ppihandbook03_8_4.php.

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13. How can I determine the quality of a fusion joint?

The Plastics Pipe Institute’s website at http://www.plasticpipe.org/pdf/pubs/handbook/inspection.pdf outlines simple procedures, including the Bent Strap test, that help you determine the quality of both fusion joints and your fusion method.

Additionally, Connectra® sells its DataConnect data recorder. This unit measures and records the critical machine parameters during a fusion. This data can be stored electronically or printed out to verify proper machine performance. However, use of a data recording device is costly and usually not necessary for most applications. (Please read the white paper on data recorders in our Resources section.) Sometimes, particularly on very large diameter or special applications, a data recording device may be desirable.

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14. What is “facing”?

Facing is the procedure of evenly cutting off pipe-end material so that the two pipe ends are parallel and clean of any contaminants. On Connectra® equipment, facing is done by the machine as part of the fusion procedure.

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15. How much material should be removed in facing?

Generally one should face to the facer stops on the machine. Removing this much material will help ensure a clean and square fusion face.

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16. What pipe sizes will Connectra® machines fuse?

Connectra’s line of butt fusion machines will fuse pipe from 1/2” CTS to 42” IPS. Connectra® makes equipment to fuse pipe in IPS, DIPS, CTS, and DN sized pipes.

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17. What is an “IPS” pipe size?

IPS stands for “Iron Pipe Size”. IPS pipe is sized with nominal outside diameter, and has been the way that most polyethylene pipe has traditionally been sized.

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18. What is a “DIPS” pipe size?

DIPS stands for “Ductile Iron Pipe Size”, a sizing standard based on the outside diameter of ductile iron pipe. DIPS pipe sizes are primarily used in water systems where ductile iron pipe sizes were commonly used, and is becoming an increasingly popular sizing standard for polyethylene pipe.

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19. What is a “DN” pipe size?

DN stands for “diametre nominelle”. These sizes, in millimeters, are set by the International Standards Organization and are in use throughout the world. They roughly correlate, converting inches to millimeters, with the nominal pipe sizes commonly in use in North America .

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20. What is a “CTS” pipe size?

CTS stands for “Copper Tube Size”. Polyethylene pipe is available in small diameters to match this standard, which is primarily used in the plumbing industry, as well as occasionally in natural gas applications.

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21. What accessories are available with Connectra’s® machines?

Connectra® has a full line of accessories, including pipe stands, pyrometers, cutters, towels, etc. – anything you might need to fuse pipe.

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Northeast Gas Association


National Utility Contractors Association


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